Privacy

Privacy

Introduction

Privacy

We all have things we don't want to share with others. Not because they are illegal or because there something we need to hide, but just because they are private. For this reason, you are the one who decides what people should know about you and what you want to keep to yourself.

Did you know...?

  • Facts

      • Personal data
      • Consent
      • Information security
      • Information and access
      • Password protection
      • Do you share your location with others?
      • No surveillance during school hours
      • What are schools allowed to check?
      • Secure medical records

    Practical examples

    • Cloud accounts hacked
    • Monitors daughter's spending
    • With dad in tow
    • Camera hidden in smoke detector
    • Contact information gone astray
    • 2-year old had her own Instagram profile
    • Sharing information about the whereabouts of the royal family
    • - A Snapchat warning
    • GPS chip in the rucksack shows when kids get to school

Exercises

Discussion

  1. Adults and children, individuals and famous people all have a right to privacy. - Why is privacy an important right? - Are there places or situations where we have a greater need to be left in peace? What are they? - Have you got different views on what you think is private?
  2. The opinion of what is private and what is suitable for the public has changed. - Find examples from television, the Internet, newspapers or magazines of things you don't think would have been published 10 years ago. - What about 50 years ago? - Discuss how the boundaries for what is private have changed. - What could be positive/negative about these changes?
  3. Some parents post pictures of their children on Facebook, blogs and other websites. Is this OK? Why/why not? - Should they ask the children first? - Is it OK to post pictures of a person who is so young that he or she cannot decide for himself/herself? - In what way (if any) could this be a problem?
  4. Schools may have differing rules for computer use and there can be reasons to check the contents of pupils' devices. - Who should have access to what the pupils do on equipment used at school? Teachers? Parents? The head teacher? - What should they be allowed to check? What should they be able to use the information for? Is there a difference between private equipment and the school's equipment? - Is cyberbullying a good enough reason for a teacher to check what has taken place and who is behind it? - Find out what rules apply at your school. Do you agree with these rules? Propose your own rules and present them to the head teacher.
  5. Some parents have chosen to place a GPS chip in their child's school bag so that they always know where the child is (see life story above). - What do you think about this? - Would you think it was OK if your parents always knew exactly where you were? Why/why not? - Are there any situations where you think that it would be OK if your parents did not know exactly where you were? - And are there occasions where you think that it would be OK to be tracked? Discuss

Exercises

Individual exercises

  1. What your parents should be allowed to know about you can be different for each family. - What do you think should be the limit for what your parents should be allowed to know about you? - Should they be allowed to check through your bedside table? - Should they be able to check how you use your cash card? - Is it OK if they check the log on your PC to see what websites you have visited? - Is it OK if they use mobile services to check where you are? Why/why not? - How old should you be before your parents no longer can demand to see everything you do? - Should there be different age limits for the examples above, and if so, what should they be?
  2. Many are surprised about how much information is available about them on the Internet. - Google your own name. Did you get any hits? - If so, did you know that this information about you had been published? - Was it you or someone else who published the information? - Did they ask your permission first? - Do you think the information gives a correct impression of you? - Did you find anything you did not like and that you wish could be deleted?
  3. It is very easy to share pictures, both online and by using your mobile and various applications. - Has anyone ever published a picture of you on the Internet without asking your permission first? - Did you think this was OK? Why/why not? - Do you post pictures without asking permission? - Could you imagine situations where someone would not like or should have pictures and other information about themselves published on the Internet?
  4. Camera surveillance is increasing, both in private and public places. - Would you behave differently if you knew that you were being filmed? - Do you think it is OK that someone is always watching what you do? - Give five examples of when camera surveillance would be OK/not OK.

Videos

Privacy is a fundamental right

Privacy is a constitutional right. This film provides an introduction to what privacy is and why it is important to take care of your own and others' privacy. The film was produced by Snöball Film.

The photo album

This is one of six films made as a result of a competition for best manuscript for students in Norwegian upper secondary schools. This film is made by students at Oppegård upper secondary school.

Legislation

Legislation

The Norwegian Personal Data Act
is there to ensure that your data is used in a way that respects you. Its purpose is to ensure that your personal data are not used in a way that violates your right to privacy. (Some of the most important sections are: The definitions in Section 2, the basic requirements for the processing of personal data in Section 11, the right of access in Section 18 and other rights in Sections 27 and 28.)

The Norwegian General Civil Penal Code,
Section 390: Any person who violates another person's privacy by giving public information about personal or domestic relations shall be liable to fines or imprisonment for up to three months.

UN Convention on the Rights of the Child
Article 12:
Any child who is capable of forming his or her own views have a right to express those views freely in all matters affecting the child, the views of the child being given due weight in accordance with the age and maturity of the child. 

Article 16:
No child shall be subjected to arbitrary or unlawful interference with his or her privacy, family, home or correspondence, nor to unlawful attacks on his or her honour and reputation. 

Privacy

We all have things we don't want to share with others. Not because they are illegal or because there something we need to hide, but just because they are private. For this reason, you are the one who decides what people should know about you and what you want to keep to yourself.

Personvern 13-17 år. Skjerm med hengelås foran. Illustrasjon