Privacy

Privacy

Introduction

Privacy

We all have things we don't want to share with others. Not because they are illegal or because there is something we need to hide, but simply because they are private. Privacy means that you have a right to a private life. When you are born, your parents have control over information about you and how it is used, but as you grow up they should listen to your own views on privacy.

Did you know...?

  • Facts

      • What are personal data?
      • You have the right to be heard
      • An explicit yes
      • Look after your information
      • Ask for help
      • What are schools allowed to check?
      • Like an open diary?
      • Do you really know what you are sharing with others?

    Practical examples

    • I want to give my child freedom and respect
    • Sharing the whereabouts of the royal family with the whole world
    • - A warning
    • My mum and dad store my logs
    • Monitoring children's Internet use
    • GPS chip in the rucksack shows when kids get to school

Exercises

Discussion

  1. Adults and children, individuals and famous people all have a right to privacy. - Why do you think privacy is so important? - Are there places or situations where we have a greater need to be left in peace? What are they? - Have you got different views on what you feel is private? - Do an Internet search on some famous names. Have any pictures or information of these people been posted that you think shouldn't have? - Did you get many hits on them? - Do you think that the people themselves have posted the information and pictures or approved of them being posted?
  2. Some parents post pictures of their children on Facebook, blogs and other websites. - Is this OK? Why/why not? - Should they ask their children first? - Is it OK to post pictures of a person who is so young that he or she cannot decide for himself/herself? - In what way (if any) could this be a problem or not so good?
  3. Work in groups and discuss what you think it is OK to take pictures and videos of and what is not OK (both different things and persons, and different situations). - Do you agree where to draw the limit? - Set up rules for what you can take pictures and videos of and when you should ask before you take a picture. - Also set up rules for what it is OK to use these pictures and films for. - Are the rules different between the various groups?
  4. Some parents have chosen to place a GPS chip in their child's school bag so that they always know where the child is (see "Practical examples" above). - What do you think about this? - Would you think it was OK if your parents always knew exactly where you were? Why/why not? - Are there any situations where you think that it would be OK if your parents did not know exactly where you were? - And are there occasions where you think that it would be OK to be tracked? Discuss

Exercises

Individual exercises

  1. Privacy is a right that is important to respect. - Do you tell everyone you know about what you think and feel, or are there some people you tell more than others? - What do you tell different people and why do you tell some more than others? - Do you think that you and the other pupils in your class have different limits for what you share with others? If this is the case, what are the differences, and why do you think this is the case? - In what situations do you think privacy is even more important? What information do you think is important to keep to yourself?
  2. Some people think that parents are entitled to know everything about what their children do, but other people think that children also have a right to privacy. - Have you got rules at home about what you can use your mobile or computer for? - Did you take part in deciding these rules and do you agree with them? - Are your parents entitled to know everything you do? (Who you hang out with, what you talk about and what you do when you are together?) - Is there any difference between what parents should be allowed to know about what their children do online and what they should be allowed to know about what they do otherwise? - What do you think is the reason that some parents check the computer logs and phone messages of their children? - Should they be allowed to do this? Why/why not?
  3. It has become very easy to share pictures, both online and by using your mobile and various applications. - Has anyone ever published a picture of you on the Internet? - Did you think that was OK? Why/why not? - Did they ask you first? - Could you imagine situations where someone would not like or should not have pictures and other information about themselves published on the Internet?
  4. It is a good idea to check now and again whether there is any information about you on the Internet. - Google your own name. Did you find anything? - Did you find anything you were not aware of?

Videos

Privacy is a fundamental right

Privacy is a constitutional right. This film provides an introduction to what privacy is and why it is important to take care of your own and others' privacy. The film was produced by Snöball Film.

Legislation

Legislation

The Norwegian Personal Data Act

The Norwegian Personal Data Act is there to ensure that your data is used in a way that respects you. Anyone who wishes to use your personal data must comply with this Act.

The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child

Article 12:
Children have a right to express their views in all matters that affect them. The views of a child shall be given due weight.

Article 16:
Children shall not be subjected to unlawful interference with their private lives. They shall be protected against attacks on their honour and reputation. 

Article 18:
Parents have common responsibilities for the upbringing and development of the child. Parents, or legal guardians, have the primary responsibility for the upbringing and development of the child. The bests interests of the child shall be their basic concern.

The Children Act Section 31 - The Child's right of co-determination 

As and when the child becomes able to form its own point of view on matters that concern it, the parents shall listen to the child’s opinion before making a decision on the child’s personal situation.

Attention shall be paid to the opinion of the child, depending on the age and maturity of the child. The same applies to other persons with whom the child lives or who are involved with the child.

When the child has reached 12 years of age, considerable priority shall be given to his or her opinions. 

 

Privacy

We all have things we don't want to share with others. Not because they are illegal or because there is something we need to hide, but simply because they are private. Privacy means that you have a right to a private life. When you are born, your parents have control over information about you and how it is used, but as you grow up they should listen to your own views on privacy.

Illustrasjon personvern 9-13 år