Source criticism

Source criticism

Introduction

Source criticism

When you watch a television programme or read something in the paper, you probably assume that what you see or read is true. If you are reading things online you might also assume that you can trust the information that has been published there. But that is not always the case.

Did you know...?

  • Facts

      • Use the filter in your head
      • Tiny spies
      • Games can be very expensive
      • Copyright
      • How did you find it?
      • Sponsored links - Adlinks
      • Apps need information about you

    Practical examples

    • Victor (10) spent NOK 58,000 on mobile gaming
    • Games full of advertising
    • Letting Google do your homework
    • Fake mega-shark exposed
    • Getting a text from a fake Dad

Exercises

Discussion

  1. It is important to be critical about information you find on the Internet. Not all information you find there is true. - Perform an Internet search on some well-known names. Did you find any information that you think might be untrue? - How do you know what information to believe and what information not to believe? - Can you trust some websites more than others? Why/why not? - Do you believe everything you read in the books in the school library? - Do you believe that your teacher has the answers to all questions? - How do you know what information you can trust? - Make a check list with tips that you can use when you search for information online.
  2. The rules that apply when using the Internet to complete an assignment may vary from school to school and from class to class. - Check if the school/class have any rules regarding the use of such information. - How can the teacher know what you have written yourselves and what you have found on the Internet? - Propose rules or guidelines.
  3. Websites and bloggers can make a lot of money on advertising. - Visit some of the websites that the people in the class use most in their spare time. - Do any of them contain advertising? - Pick out five advertisements from these websites and discuss the content - What methods have they used? - Is it obvious that it is advertising? - Does the advert provide good information about the product? - Visit some of the most popular blogs and check for sponsored comments. - How have they been labelled? - Is it obvious that it is advertising?

Exercises

Individual exercises

  1. Whether you are reading a newspaper or doing something online you are surrounded by advertising, regardless of whether you notice it or not. - Have you ever experienced an advert popping up and distracting you from what you are doing on your phone or online? - Why do you think advertising is used in this way? - Are you aware of any gaming sites created by companies that wish to sell a product? Which?
  2. Many advertisers suggest that you use your phone or computer to pay for what you buy. - Do you think this makes people buy more than if they had paid with cash? - Have you ever used your phone to buy or pay for something? Did you get the item you wanted? - Have you ever used money on the Internet or your phone without realising it? If this is the case - how?
  3. Copyright is an important legal right. - Find out what it means. - Why is it so important to have rules about this? - Have you ever downloaded music or films from the Internet? - Did you pay for downloading them? - Did you share the music or film with someone else afterwards?

Videos

What is digital responsibility?

What is digital responsibility, and why do we need it? This short film is made by Sølvsuper on behalf of dubestemmer.no.
Source criticism

When you watch a television programme or read something in the paper, you probably assume that what you see or read is true. If you are reading things online you might also assume that you can trust the information that has been published there. But that is not always the case.

Illustrasjon kildekritikk 9-13 år